25- to 20-Million-Year-Old Amber Fossils

A tiny parasitic wasp in Baltic amber, approximately 40 to 35 million years old. The wings, antennae, complex eyes and joints are completely preserved.

Two beetle species in Dominican amber, approximately 25 to 20 million years old.

A 25- to 20-million-year-old fossil insect. Insects sometimes managed to escape being entrapped in resin by leaving their body parts such as legs or wings.

Sciarid flies are common today and were common in the tropical amber forests millions of years ago. This 25- to 20-million-year old inclusion shows some good preservation of structural detail such as legs, wings and compound eyes.

Fossil bark louse in Dominican amber, approximately 25 million years old. It is perfectly preserved so that even its antennal hairs and its wing pigmentation were kept.

 

Larva of hoverfly (syrphid) in Baltic amber, approximately 40 to 30 million years old.

A very small fossil mite in Baltic amber, 50 to 35 million years old.

Neotropical ant in Dominican amber, approximately 25 to 20 million years old. Some parts of this worker ant’s legs are missing, but an eye and its body hairs are still present.

A 40-million-year-old Baltic amber containing a tiny fly.

A tiny grasshopper within 35- to 30-million-year-old Baltic amber. By the physical and chemical processes involved in the resin’s transformation into amber, the grasshopper assumes both the golden color and the consistency of the material in which it is embedded.

A fossil fly in a 50- to 35-million-year-old Baltic amber. The external surface details of its body are very well defined.

The inclusion in an approximately 25-million-year-old Dominican amber looks like a winged ant, but is actually a parasitic wasp. A winged termite in Baltic amber. Since termites can consume and utilize the cellulose in wood as a nutrient, they are common inhabitants of the forests such as this Baltic amber forest 45 to 30 million years ago.

A long-legged fly in a 50- to 35-million-year-old Baltic amber.

A small fossil beetle dating back 25 to 20 million years. The external bodily details are particularly well preserved.

A 25-million-year-old fungus gnat. This specimen is very well preserved with its eyes and other structural details.

A fossil lizard, 50 to 35 million years old.
A wind scorpion in a 25- to 20-million-year-old Dominican amber.






A fossil tropical millipede could not free itself, even though it had many legs. This Dominican amber is approximately 25 million years old.

Fossilized spider and fly dating back 25 to 20 million years. The spider is the predator, and the fly its prey.
A scorpion in Dominican amber, measuring over 4 centimeters, is approximately 20 to 15 million years old. This scorpion has lost its pincers and its head but the rest is very well preserved. It is not any different at all from the ones living today.

All Ambers
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